I'm right

I say we need to take this pandemic seriously if we don't want to see more unnecessary suffering. We need to wear masks, close bars and theatres and keep a distance wherever we go, whatever we do. Over a million have already died of Covid, the hospitals are filling up again. I've seen it on Facebook, someone mentioned it, a doctor talked about it. There will be dark times ahead unless we do as we're told. I'm right, I know I am.


And you're wrong!


You say we need to wake up and realize that this is no accident but a plandemic. We should refuse to wear masks, keep bars and theatres open and hug as much as we can, because there's no place for fear in the presence of love. Millions have died? You say you don't know a single one. Hospitals are filling up because it's winter, they always fill up in winter, and the numbers are made up anyway. You've seen it, on Facebook, someone mentioned it, a doctor talked about it. There will be dark times ahead unless we stop doing as we're told. You're right, you know you are.


And that means I'm wrong!


We could do the same exercise with many other subjects. At some point, however, we have to ask ourselves if we really want to continue arguing and fighting, desperately trying to convince those on the other side that we are right and they are wrong. An endless struggle, causing more division and leading to the same grim place all these stubborn struggles have led to in the past: war.


Perhaps we're both right? And both wrong. In the battle between A and B, is there an option C?


Admittedly, it isn't easy considering we might be wrong, even it's only half wrong. I've just published a new book, a story about an old woman facing the escalating climate crisis. I'm totally convinced that we're headed towards a terrible future if we don‘t change our unsustainable habits as soon as possible. And with 'as soon as possible' I mean within the next 5 to 10 years – massive changes, much bigger than those we were forced to endure during the lockdowns of 2020. I know I'm right. But – and this is stated in the book as well – there is the theoretical chance that I'm wrong. Would it change the message of the book? No. But it would mean I'd have to admit I wasn't completely right.


Now, there are certain things that are excluded from the 'who's right, who's wrong' game. Racism for example. If you're a racist, you're an arsehole, period. There's absolutely no justification for discriminating other human beings just because they look different. Same goes for praying to a different god or loving in a different way.


But what about everything else? Isn't there an option C we can all agree on, some common ground? Here are a few suggestions:


* we all want functioning hospitals * nobody wants to die alone * fear – of a virus or of losing freedom – isn't a pleasant emotion


* we produce far too much pollution

* sustainable living is totally possible

* this planet is our home, and we only have one home

* no president will solve all problems * billionaires could solve lots of problems * poverty is causing too many problems

* having no food sucks * wasting food sucks * toxic food sucks

* we love trees * we love sunsets * we love the feeling of helping others

If we agreed on some common ground, the chances of having constructive and respectful discussions rather than destructive and hateful disputes would be much higher. Let's face it: We're in desperate need of peace and health and a little bit of sanity. We need to stop being selfish and start seeing the beauty of life, embrace the chances we are given, become happy as one global community, with all the different flags and lots of love for another.

I know, it probably ain't gonna happen. But it's a good idea, right?





New book: FRIDAYS FOR FRIDA (in German; out in English in spring 2021)